Housing Costs and Economic Hardship for Low-Income Families

 

Mimura, Y. (2008). Housing cost burden, poverty status, and economic hardship among low-income families. Journal of Family and Economic Issues, 29(1), 152-165.

Brief Description: Poverty status better explains the economic hardship of low-income families than does the housing cost burden. However, poverty status explains the economic hardship of White and Black low-income families with children differently. It appears that poverty status can explain variation in hardship among White families better than among Black families. This presents further economic disadvantage …

Identifying Weaknesses in Practitioners’ Housing Affordability Indices

 

Jewkes, M. D. & Delgadillo, L. M. (2010). Weaknesses of housing affordability indices used by practitioners. Journal of Financial Counseling and Planning Education, 21 (1), pp. 43-52.

Brief Description:  Three housing affordability indices are commonly used to assess one’s ability to qualify for mortgages and for housing programs. Strengths and weaknesses are presented. Weaknesses include use of gross income instead of take-home pay, and no consideration of household size or preferences. The affordability ratio, paying 30 percent of one’s income …

Assessing Farm Households’ Investment Education Needs

 

O’Neill, B., Porter, N. M., Pankow, D., Schuchardt, J. & Johnson, J. (2010). Online investment education: Listening to learners to develop an effective financial literacy program for farm households. Journal of Financial Counseling and Planning Education, 21 (1), pp. 25-42.

Brief Description:  Quantitative and qualitative data were collected from farm households to better understand their investment attitudes, practices, and learning preferences in order to adapt an online investment course for their needs. Researchers found that farmers are a distinct audience …

Automated Saving and Investing Strategies

 

O’Neill, B. (2007) Overcoming Inertia: Do Automated Saving and Investing Strategies Work? Journal of Family and Economic Issues 28(2), 321-335. http://www.springerlink.com/content/wt1653190x010357/

Brief Description: Various automated strategies have been implemented by employers with the objective of increasing retirement plan participation. Automatic strategies work by proactively arranging some type of action (e.g., plan enrollment) to occur unless people specifically opt out. This article examines and synthesizes previous empirical research about five automatic savings and investing strategies: (a) automatic retirement savings plan …

Decrease in Stock Ownership by Minority Households

 

Hanna, S. D. & Lindamood, S.( 2008). The decrease in stock ownership by minority households. Journal of Financial Counseling and Planning, 19(2), 29-45.

Brief Description: Researchers have found that White households are more likely to own stocks that minority households. Although stock ownership rates increased for minority households from 1992 to 2001, they declined significantly between 2001 and 2004.

Implications: Credit counseling agencies should monitor the clients’ intentions of completing their debt management plans and incorporate educational components that …

Effects of Capital Accumulation Ratio on Wealth

 

Harness, N.J., Finke, M.S., & Chatterjee, S. (2009). The effects of the capital accumulation ratio on wealth. Journal of Financial Counseling and Planning Education, 20(1), 44-57.

Brief Description: The capital accumulation ratio (CAR) is a measure of household portfolio quality used by financial practitioners and in academic research. It measures investment assets divided by net worth. This study tested whether a higher CAR impacted household wealth over a specific decade (1994 to 2004) among respondents in the accumulation stage …

Racial/Ethnic Differences in High Return Investment Ownership

 

Hanna, S. D., Wang, C. & Yuh, Y. (2010). Racial/ethnic differences in high return investment ownership: A decomposition analysis. Journal of Financial Counseling and Planning Education, 21 (2), pp. 44-59.

Brief Description:  Research on ownership of high risk/high return assets shows that Black and Hispanic households are much less likely to own them than are White households, even after education is taken into account. This study uses a decomposition strategy to examine how minority households would invest if they had …

Assertiveness and Investment Risk of Married Couples

 

Gilliam, J., Dass, M., Durband, D. B. & Hampton, V. (2010). The role of assertiveness in portfolio risk and financial risk tolerance among married couples. Journal of Financial Counseling and Planning 21 (1), pp. 53-67.

Brief Description:  Couples who were clients of financial planners were surveyed regarding their assertiveness, risk tolerance and investment portfolios. No relationship was found between assertiveness and risk tolerance or portfolio risk level. There was a positive relationship between wife’s proportion of asset holding (higher relative …

Women’s investment decision-making

 

Loibl, C., Lee, J., Mentel-Gaeta, E., Fox. J. (2007). Women’s high-consequence decision making: A nonstatic and complex choice process. Financial Counseling and Planning, 18(2), 35-47.

Brief Description: Using qualitative data from a focus group of female investors, this study examined choice processes used when making mutual fund decisions in employer retirement plans. It found that investment decision-making is a compromise between the goals of increased accuracy and a desire to limit cognitive effort. Observations included a lack of investment information …

Factors related to being in higher income categories

 

DeVaney, S. A., & Anong, S. T. (2007). Income quintiles: Examining changes in the characteristics of respondents. Financial Counseling and Planning, 18(2), 19-34.

Brief Description: This study identified characteristics of Survey of Consumer Finances (SCF) respondents in different income distribution quintiles in 1998, 2001, and 2004. Characteristics associated with being in the upper and upper-middle income quintiles included age, education, homeownership, luxury vehicle ownership, and regular savings. Variables that were not significant included gender and family type and attitude …