Sara Croymans

Sara is committed to assisting individuals develop critical life skills in financial capability. She has taught individuals, educators and community agency staff on a variety of topics including youth and money, decision making, tenant education, learning styles and financial recovery after disasters.

Sara is a Family Resource Management Educator with the University of Minnesota Extension. She received her B.S. in home economic education and extension from South Dakota State University and her M.Ed. from the University of Minnesota. Sara became …

Keeping Your Financial Records Secure

Computer on a desk.Photo by Ian Dick. Used with permission.

Watch this webinar recording Keeping Your Financial Records Secure and learn how to manage your financial records – paper, electronic, and web-based – to keep them secure and accessible at all times. 

WATCH WEBINAR

This webinar was presented by Sara Croymans, Lori Scharmer, and Steve Judd. Croymans is a family resiliency Extension educator with University of Minnesota; Scharmer is a North Dakota State University Extension family economics specialist; and Judd is manager …

Returning to Your Damaged Home


Returning to Your Damaged Home

When returning to your damaged home think safety first. You may not be able to return to your property until it is declared safe to do so by local officials but you can begin necessary steps towards financial recovery. Document what happened, when it happened and what damage was sustained. List damage and take photos or video as you clean. You’ll need written documentation of damage and loss for insurance claims, applications for disaster assistance

Recovering After a Disaster Using The Family Financial Toolkit


 

Putting Your Financial Recovery Puzzle Together After a Disaster

A natural disaster can strike anywhere, any time. Natural disasters often leave in their wake damage and destruction that have long-term impacts on the financial well-being of survivors. If you or a loved one has been affected by a natural disaster, it’s important to know that financial recovery takes time. There are no easy fixes and no guarantees.

This Recovery After Disaster: The Family Financial Toolkit discusses strategies and provides tools …

What information should I have in my household inventory?

A complete household inventory consists of:

• a description of each item owned (include model and serial numbers)

• the date you acquired it and how much you paid for it if you purchased it

• its current value

The more detailed the information, the better.

To complement written records, include digital camera files, photographs, or videos. One method would be to film from one end of your house to the other, providing information and commentary on your possessions (this …

How can I organize my personal and financial papers in case of an emergency?

Organizing your personal and financial documents in case of emergency is a smart thing to do. Having these documents organized and available will help get your finances on track in the event of a crisis such as a death in the family or recovery following a natural disaster.

The Emergency Financial First Aid Kit at http://www.operationhope.org/images/uploads/Files/effak2.pdf is an excellent tool to get your papers in order.

You may also want to create a “Grab ‘n’ Go” box that is portable, …

Family Disaster Plan

 

Family Disaster Plan

Having a plan can help your family make it through most disasters with minimal stress. A family disaster plan simply helps you organize information so it’s easy to access before, during or after a

disaster.

Begin the process by completing a Family Emergency Plan document like the one at www.ready.gov or by University of Missouri Extension. Fill in phone numbers, out-of-town contacts, meetingplaces and information about each family member and pets. Include information about insurance and …

If a Disaster Strikes, Could Your Finances Weather The Storm?

Budget written on paper.

Managing Finances in Times of Disaster

As the process of healing and rebuilding continues ever so slowly in areas ravaged by Hurricane Harvey and Hurricane Irma, many of us are taking a closer look at our own lives. While most of us don’t live in hurricane-prone areas, we are all reminded of the possibility of disaster knocking at our door. Mother Nature may provide the most striking examples with hurricanes, earthquakes and tsunamis, but a house fire, car accident, serious

How to Create Your Own Personal Disaster Preparedness Guide

Tablet showing the Personal Disaster Preparedness Guide.

The Personal Disaster Preparedness Guide developed by Operation Hope, will allow you to advise family members of your recovery process and to reassure them if you are not affected by an event in your city. The ability to contact family members and locate injured relatives is the first step to recovery. We advise that families and individuals keep one copy safe at home and one at the workplace, or another safe place. If you’re not really sure about a …

Grab and Go Box

If you live in an area prone to natural disasters that could require evacuation, consider creating a grab-and-go box. Use a durable, sealed waterproof box or backpack. Put in copies of everything that is in your emergency file, and add other important papers:

 

  • Medical prescriptions, including eyeglasses
  • Copies of children’s immunization records
  • Copies of all insurance cards and policies
  • Copies of the back and front of your credit cards
  • Cash or traveler’s checks for several days of living expenses