What is the difference between bronze, silver, gold and platinum plans?

In order to be included in the Health Insurance Marketplace, each insurance company can offer four different types of “qualified” health insurance plans– Bronze, Silver, Gold, and Platinum.

A Bronze Plan will cover 60% of health care costs with the consumer responsible for paying 40%. For Silver plans insurance companies pay 70% of costs and the consumer pays 30%. For Gold Plans, the split is 80%-20% and for Platinum the split is 90%-10%.  In general, the more the company …

Can grandchildren being taken care of by grandparents be on our insurance until age 26 and what if we go on Medicare?

Grandparent

Grandparent

If you are the legal guardian or foster parent, your grandchildren can be added to a healthcare plan you purchase on your own through your employer until they reach the age of 26. If you are not the legal guardian, they will not be covered in your individual or employer plans and you will have to look at other options.

Medicare is and will remain as individual health insurance only for those 65 and over. If you are on …

What is the difference between a premium, a co-pay and and out-of-pocket expense?

Health Insurance Plan costs can be broken into two categories: cost of having the plan and costs of using the plan. In order to purchase and continue to have health insurance coverage, you have to pay a premium. The premium is paid on a regular basis such as a certain amount monthly, quarterly or yearly. It is typical that when purchased through your employer, the plan premium is deducted from each paycheck. Basically, the premium buys you the health …

What is the difference between a financial institution and an insurance company?

A financial institution is an organization that provides services that people need to manage their money. Financial institutions include different types of banks and credit unions.

Insurance companies are a type of “non-bank” financial institution that sell policies that provide protection from various kinds of risks. Risks that insurance policies cover include the loss of life, income, or possessions and the high cost of medical bills.

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What is the difference between a peril and a hazard?

A peril is any event that can cause a financial loss. Examples include a car crash, death, disability, fires, floods, illness, theft, and tornadoes (wind). An insurance agent can help you calculate the potential loss that you might experience from various types of perils as part of the process of determining how much coverage you need.

For example, insurance agents routinely use worksheets to determine a family’s life insurance needs. You might also be able to estimate the cost of …

Does your health insurance premium go toward your deductible?

In most instances, the answer is no. Premiums and deductibles are two separate payments related to an insurance policy. A premium is paid to simply have insurance coverage in place regardless of whether or not a claim is ever made. A deductible is paid if there is a claim and is the amount paid out of pocket by the insured before insurance benefits are received.

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What do the acronyms SUI and SDI on my paycheck stub stand for?

SUI is an acronym for “state unemployment tax.” This deduction from your paycheck is used to provide funds to your state for temporary support of workers who have lost their jobs. State unemployment benefits are generally limited to a specific time period, and those who receive them must be actively searching for a job.

SDI is an acronym for “state disability insurance.” Some states call it TDI for “temporary disability insurance.” Not every state has this tax, but those that …