What Are the Minimum and Maximum Amounts That Can be Saved Each Year in an IRA?

Federal tax law limits 2017 contributions to a traditional and/or Roth IRA to $5,500 for a worker with earned income ($6,500 for those who are age 50 or older before the end of the year). An additional $5,500 can also be saved for a worker’s spouse, regardless of whether or not the spouse is employed. In addition, spouses who are age 50 or older can contribute an additional $1,000 ($6,500 total) for a total of $13,000 of contributions if both …

What Are the Income Restrictions to Qualify for a Deductible Traditional IRA?

People with earned income who are not in an employer-sponsored retirement plan, regardless of income level, may qualify for a tax deductible traditional IRA. Another group of taxpayers who can deduct a traditional IRA contribution in full are those with an employer-sponsored plan who have incomes in 2017 under $62,000 (single) and $99,000 (married couples filing jointly). The phase-out ranges (where contributions are limited in gradual steps as income increases) for singles and couples are $62,000 to $72,000 and $99,000 …

When Can Someone Withdraw Money from a Roth IRA Without Owing Income Taxes?

You can withdraw money that you have contributed to a Roth IRA (i.e., your own money) at any time because the account was funded with after-tax dollars on which income taxes were already paid.

You can withdraw the earnings from a Roth IRA tax free in the following situations:

1. You have reached the age of 59½, and at least five years have passed since your Roth IRA account was opened. Earnings can be withdrawn tax-free beginning on the first …

What is the Capital Gains Exclusion for the Sale of a House?

Single taxpayers can exclude up to $250,000 of capital gains on the sale of a home, and married taxpayers filing jointly can exclude $500,000.

Taxpayers are eligible for the exclusion if they have owned and used a home as their main home for a period aggregating at least two years out of the five years prior to its date of sale. The exclusion is allowed each time that you sell a primary residence but no more than once every two …

How Long Do You Need to Work to Receive Social Security Retirement Benefits?

To qualify for Social Security retirement benefits, you must generally have “40 quarters of coverage.” This means that you must have been working for 10 years and earning at least the minimum income (adjusted annually for inflation) required to receive a quarter of coverage.

For example, in 2017, you can receive one quarter of coverage for each $1,300 of earnings, up to the maximum of four quarters of credit per year. Thus, the maximum amount of income needed to earn …

How Long Can Negative Information Remain in a Credit Report?

A consumer reporting company can report most accurate negative information for seven years and bankruptcy information for up to 10 years.

There is no time limit on reporting information about criminal convictions; information reported in response to your application for a job that pays more than $75,000 a year; and information reported because you’ve applied for more than $150,000 worth of credit or life insurance.

Information about a lawsuit or an unpaid judgment against you can be reported for seven …

Can You Split a Federal Income Tax Refund Between a Direct Deposit and a Paper Check?

No. You cannot split your refund between a direct deposit and a paper check. According to IRS tax refund procedures, you can either opt for the safety, security, and speed of direct deposit to one, two, or three different accounts, or you can request your refund via a paper check, but you cannot combine the two refund methods.

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How do I get less FICA tax taken out of my paycheck?

The percentage of income for FICA tax that workers pay is determined by federal law and is the same for everyone. The only way to pay less FICA tax (as a dollar amount, not a percentage of pay) is to earn less income. FICA stands for Federal Insurance Contributions Act. FICA consists of two separate payroll taxes: Social Security (6.2% of pay) and Medicare (1.45% of pay), for a total of 7.65% of pay.

FICA tax is paid by workers …

My mother passed away more than three years ago. The estate has long been settled. How long do I need to keep her financial records? Her house was passed on to her four children.

Which records to keep and how long during one’s lifetime depends on the type of record being considered.

See this page for guidelines: Organize Your Important Papers.

In regard to estate issues after someone’s lifetime, you should keep the estate financial records 7 to 10 years or more from the time the estate was settled (not the date of death). It is necessary to keep records for this length of time because, if income on the estate was underreported …

Is unit pricing mandatory in large U.S. grocery stores?

Unit pricing regulations usually require the posting of unit price per pound, ounce, etc., on supermarket shelves for each consumer commodity, along with the sales price, so that consumers can compare value more easily. A careful review of unit pricing regulation shows no mention of a retail outlet’s size. Rather, it seems that each state has authority to decide what unit pricing regulation it desires, if any, and regulatory differences between states are expressed in various categories of products, but …