Women’s investment decision-making

 

Loibl, C., Lee, J., Mentel-Gaeta, E., Fox. J. (2007). Women’s high-consequence decision making: A nonstatic and complex choice process. Financial Counseling and Planning, 18(2), 35-47.

Brief Description: Using qualitative data from a focus group of female investors, this study examined choice processes used when making mutual fund decisions in employer retirement plans. It found that investment decision-making is a compromise between the goals of increased accuracy and a desire to limit cognitive effort. Observations included a lack of investment information …

Wills, Trusts and Charitable Estate Planning

 

James, R.N. (2009). Wills, trusts, and charitable estate planning: An analysis of document effectiveness using panel data. Journal of Financial Counseling and Planning Education, 20(1), 3-14.

Brief Description: This study compared pre-death charitable estate plans with post-death distributions using a large national data set with over 26,000 individuals. It found that most respondents with charitable estate plans ultimately generated no charitable estate gift after death. The likelihood of making charitable gifts was significantly higher for those who funded an …

Assessing Farm Households’ Investment Education Needs

 

O’Neill, B., Porter, N. M., Pankow, D., Schuchardt, J. & Johnson, J. (2010). Online investment education: Listening to learners to develop an effective financial literacy program for farm households. Journal of Financial Counseling and Planning Education, 21 (1), pp. 25-42.

Brief Description:  Quantitative and qualitative data were collected from farm households to better understand their investment attitudes, practices, and learning preferences in order to adapt an online investment course for their needs. Researchers found that farmers are a distinct audience …

Automated Saving and Investing Strategies

 

O’Neill, B. (2007) Overcoming Inertia: Do Automated Saving and Investing Strategies Work? Journal of Family and Economic Issues 28(2), 321-335. http://www.springerlink.com/content/wt1653190x010357/

Brief Description: Various automated strategies have been implemented by employers with the objective of increasing retirement plan participation. Automatic strategies work by proactively arranging some type of action (e.g., plan enrollment) to occur unless people specifically opt out. This article examines and synthesizes previous empirical research about five automatic savings and investing strategies: (a) automatic retirement savings plan …

Effects of Information on Consumers’ Perceptions of Mutual Funds

 

Kozup, John C., Elizabeth Howlett and Michael Pagano (2008), The Effects of Summary Information on Consumer Perceptions of Mutual Fund Characteristics, Journal Consumer Affairs, 42(1), 37-59.

Brief Description: Choosing how to best invest for retirement is one of the most important decisions a consumer can make. Unfortunately, this can be an especially challenging task given the current financial information disclosure environment. The objective of this research was to explore whether a single page supplemental information disclosure impacts investors’ fund …

Educating Widows in Personal Financial Planning

 

Korb, B. R. (2010). Financial planners: Educating widows in personal financial planning. Journal of Financial Counseling and Planning 21 (2), pp. 3-15.

Brief Description:  Financial planners and their widowed clients were interviewed. Research revealed that widows vary by age in terms of their knowledge level and risk tolerance as well as their needs for financial advice and education, with the younger widows were less risk adverse and more financially literate but in need of financial guidance for a longer time …

Measuring Financial Risk Tolerance

Gilliam, J. Chatterjee, S. & Grable, J. (2010). Measuring the perception of financial risk tolerance: A tale of two measures. Journal of Financial Counseling and Planning, 21 (2), pp. 30-43.

Brief Description:  Estimating a person’s risk tolerance is important for guiding him or her into a satisfactory investment portfolio. The Survey of Consumer Finance (SCF) simple measure for assessing risk tolerance was compared to a 13-item scale (GL-RTS) in assessing risky and non-risky asset holdings by university faculty and staff. …

Gender Differences in Personal Saving Behaviors

Fisher, P. J. (2010). Gender differences in personal saving behaviors. Journal of Financial Counseling and Planning Education, 21′(1), pp. 14-24.

http://6aa7f5c4a9901a3e1a1682793cd11f5a6b732d29.gripelements.com/pdf/volume_21_issue_1/pattiejfisher.pdf

Brief Description:  Gender differences in personal saving behaviors among single person households were investigated using data from the 2007 Survey of Consumer Finances (SCF). Using logistic regression analysis, the researcher found that women were less likely to save in the short term if they were in poor health, but health made no difference for males. Women with low risk …